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Dope Tattoos | Unique Tattoo Designs

 

 

Unique Tattoo Designs

Dope Tattoos – promoting ink culture

An introduction to tattoo design.
Tattooing, or marking the body with a permanent design by inserting pigment into the skin, is an art form that dates back thousands of years. While some tattoos hold cultural significance, many people get body art for aesthetic or sentimental reasons. Tattoos are an opportunity for people to creatively express themselves. “I encourage my clients to choose tattoos that mean something to them, but to also look at them as artwork, because it’ll be on their body forever,” says tattoo artist Lorraine Salazar.

Creating tattoos is a unique design challenge. With a curved canvas and complex tools, these designs need to follow specific rules to look good in the long term. When talking with clients about their ideal tattoo, be sure to set expectations with them and explain your techniques and specialties. Creating a design you’re comfortable tattooing will ensure it looks beautiful for years to come and help you create the best tattoo for each unique customer.Still, research now indicates tattoos aren’t bad for everyone. In people who heal well, getting a tattoo may prime their germ-fighting immune systems for action — and in a good way. The rub: Until someone gets a tattoo, there’s no way to know if they will be someone who benefits or instead be harmed.

If you hate getting shots, then tattoos aren’t for you. When a person gets a tattoo, a needle injects ink into the skin, over and over and over again.

375_skin_layers.png
Tattoo ink is injected into the dermis — the thick middle layer of the skin.
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
When a tattoo is done right, that ink winds up in the dermis. This layer of skin lies beneath the epidermis, the outer layer that we see. The epidermis is always growing new skin cells and shedding old ones. If tattoo ink were placed there, it would last only about a month before disappearing.

But cells of the dermis don’t replace themselves in the same way. That’s what makes this thick layer of skin the ideal spot for installing a permanent image. The dermis also is home to nerve endings, so you can feel each needle prick. Ouch! Finally, this part of the skin receives the area’s blood supply. So things can get messy as ink is injected into the dermis.

Normally, the body’s immune cells would react to being pricked and injected with ink. After all, getting a tattoo means putting foreign particles in the body. The immune system should respond by removing them — or at least trying to. But the molecules of tattoo ink are too big for those cells to deal with. That’s what makes a tattoo a permanent piece of body art.

Organic chemicals contain carbon. Inorganic ones don’t. The inks used for tattoos can be either inorganic or organic, notes Tina Alster. She’s a dermatologist, or skin specialist, at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. She also directs the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery. Inorganic inks are made of minerals, salts or the metal oxides found in nature. (Metal oxides are molecules that contain metal atoms and oxygen atoms.) Inorganic inks can be black, red, yellow, white or blue. Organic colors contain lots of carbon and hydrogen atoms. The ones used in tattoo ink are synthetic, meaning manufactured. Organic inks come in a much wider array of colors than do the inorganic ones.

375_tattooist_working.png
A tattoo artist adds red to an existing tattoo. Intricate tattoos require multiple sessions to complete.
BELYJMISHKA/ISTOCKPHOTO
Tattoo inks are made to be injected into the skin. But the pigments that give these inks their color were made for printer inks or car paints — not people, Alster explains. The Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, makes rules about what kinds of colors can be added to food, cosmetics and drugs. Although FDA could regulate tattoo inks, it hasn’t done so yet. So no ink is currently approved for use in human skin, Alster notes.

That may change, however. FDA currently is studying the health effects of tattoo inks. The reason? More and more people have been reporting harmful reactions to them. Some tattoos make a person’s skin tender and itchy. This usually is due to an allergic reaction to some ingredient in colored inks

In some people, the skin around a tattoo may gets bumpy or scaly. “This is also due to inflammation and irritation [in response] to the tattoo inks,” Alster says. Inflammation is the pain, swelling and redness that can accompany an injury. It “may even indicate infection,” she points out.

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An introduction to tattoo design.
Tattooing, or marking the body with a permanent design by inserting pigment into the skin, is an art form that dates back thousands of years. While some tattoos hold cultural significance, many people get body art for aesthetic or sentimental reasons. Tattoos are an opportunity for people to creatively express themselves. “I encourage my clients to choose tattoos that mean something to them, but to also look at them as artwork, because it’ll be on their body forever,” says tattoo artist Lorraine Salazar.

Creating tattoos is a unique design challenge. With a curved canvas and complex tools, these designs need to follow specific rules to look good in the long term. When talking with clients about their ideal tattoo, be sure to set expectations with them and explain your techniques and specialties. Creating a design you’re comfortable tattooing will ensure it looks beautiful for years to come and help you create the best tattoo for each unique customer.Still, research now indicates tattoos aren’t bad for everyone. In people who heal well, getting a tattoo may prime their germ-fighting immune systems for action — and in a good way. The rub: Until someone gets a tattoo, there’s no way to know if they will be someone who benefits or instead be harmed.

If you hate getting shots, then tattoos aren’t for you. When a person gets a tattoo, a needle injects ink into the skin, over and over and over again.

375_skin_layers.png
Tattoo ink is injected into the dermis — the thick middle layer of the skin.
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
When a tattoo is done right, that ink winds up in the dermis. This layer of skin lies beneath the epidermis, the outer layer that we see. The epidermis is always growing new skin cells and shedding old ones. If tattoo ink were placed there, it would last only about a month before disappearing.

But cells of the dermis don’t replace themselves in the same way. That’s what makes this thick layer of skin the ideal spot for installing a permanent image. The dermis also is home to nerve endings, so you can feel each needle prick. Ouch! Finally, this part of the skin receives the area’s blood supply. So things can get messy as ink is injected into the dermis.

Normally, the body’s immune cells would react to being pricked and injected with ink. After all, getting a tattoo means putting foreign particles in the body. The immune system should respond by removing them — or at least trying to. But the molecules of tattoo ink are too big for those cells to deal with. That’s what makes a tattoo a permanent piece of body art.

Organic chemicals contain carbon. Inorganic ones don’t. The inks used for tattoos can be either inorganic or organic, notes Tina Alster. She’s a dermatologist, or skin specialist, at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. She also directs the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery. Inorganic inks are made of minerals, salts or the metal oxides found in nature. (Metal oxides are molecules that contain metal atoms and oxygen atoms.) Inorganic inks can be black, red, yellow, white or blue. Organic colors contain lots of carbon and hydrogen atoms. The ones used in tattoo ink are synthetic, meaning manufactured. Organic inks come in a much wider array of colors than do the inorganic ones.

375_tattooist_working.png
A tattoo artist adds red to an existing tattoo. Intricate tattoos require multiple sessions to complete.
BELYJMISHKA/ISTOCKPHOTO
Tattoo inks are made to be injected into the skin. But the pigments that give these inks their color were made for printer inks or car paints — not people, Alster explains. The Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, makes rules about what kinds of colors can be added to food, cosmetics and drugs. Although FDA could regulate tattoo inks, it hasn’t done so yet. So no ink is currently approved for use in human skin, Alster notes.

That may change, however. FDA currently is studying the health effects of tattoo inks. The reason? More and more people have been reporting harmful reactions to them. Some tattoos make a person’s skin tender and itchy. This usually is due to an allergic reaction to some ingredient in colored inks

In some people, the skin around a tattoo may gets bumpy or scaly. “This is also due to inflammation and irritation [in response] to the tattoo inks,” Alster says. Inflammation is the pain, swelling and redness that can accompany an injury. It “may even indicate infection,” she points out.

tattoo designs,tattoo,unique tattoo designs,tattoo design,tattoo ideas,tattoo designs for men,unique tattoo ideas,tattoos,tattoo designs for girls,unique tattoos,unique tattoos for men,simple tattoo designs,the unique tattoo,unique tattoo design,tattoos for men,simple tattoo designs for girls,awesome tattoo design,tattoo design ideas men,unique phoenix tattoo design for women,tatoo making on hand,tattoo world,getting inked

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